Relay 201 821 00 47 for the Mercedes-Benz SEL and SEC Models in the W126 Series

Relay (for indicator lights, hazard lights, wipers, etc.) 201 821 00 47 for the Mercedes-Benz SEL and SEC Models in the W126 Series
Part number 201 821 00 47 belongs to the relay for the indicator lights, hazard lights, wipers, etc. for the Mercedes-Benz SEL and SEC Models in the W126 Series.

We guarantee that this part will fit the following models in the 1979 – 1991 Mercedes-Benz S Class a.k.a. W126 Series:

  • The following four-door models:
    • 300 SD (1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 300 SDL (1986, 1987)
    • 300 SE (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991)
    • 300 SEL (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993)
    • 350 SD (1991)
    • 350 SD (1990, 1991)
    • 380 SE (1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 380 SEL (1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 420 SEL (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991)
    • 500 SEL (1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 560 SEL (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991)
  • The following two-door models:
    • 380 SEC (1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 500 SEC (1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985)
    • 560 SEC (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991)

We are offering this part (number 201 821 00 47) used and guaranteed, for $40.

  • Please add $15 for shipping to anywhere in the US.
  • Nevada residents, please add 30 cents (which is 7.6%) for sales tax.

Our parts are used but original Mercedes-Benz quality, guaranteed to fit and work, otherwise (your choice):

  • We replace it at no charge or
  • We refund your money and the shipping costs to you and back to us.

Below is a little write-up that we hope you will enjoy — one more reason to be enthused about keeping your Mercedes-Benz on the road. You could buy the parts from a vendor who doesn’t understand or care about Mercedes-Benz cars, or you could buy from enthusiasts like us. We hope you choose us!


To remove the part, you normally don’t need any tools (how nice is that?) First, look at the above picture to see how the pins look. Then grasp the module firmly but gently, and slowly wiggle the module back and forth, to “walk” the little pins loose. Then, lift up the module and move it up and away from the general area.

If it’s stuck, resist the temptation to yank it hard. Either keep patiently wiggling it, or work a screwdriver or dull knife under the edge of the relay to pry it up.

To install the replacement, make sure the pins are aligned correctly, and then gently place the module in position and push down until you feel that it is seated.


This should help dispel the myth about Mercedes-Benz vehicles being overly complex. Yes, the internal functionality is complex, and necessarily so, but Mercedes-Benz has made that nicely modularized, and the part is so exceedingly easy to remove and to install that you require no specialized tools or knowledge. That’s about as simple and easy as something like this can be.


In software design, modularization is good. The same is often true for electrical circuit design. Mercedes-Benz seems to be exemplary. Rather than spreading the complexities of the turn signals, hazards, wipers, rear defroster and trailer hook-up across a massively complex wiring harness, Mercedes-Benz consolidated it into one nice module that’s easy to remove and to install. It’s typically in the engine compartment on the driver’s side, close to the firewall, or inside the (nicely protected) fuse box. The functionality and design of this particular module have been so universally applicable that it was used in many models in the W126 series, the 1979 – 1991 S class, over many years.

This standardization reduces the production costs as well as inventory costs for the factory and repair shops.

This means the money for purchasing and servicing your Mercedes-Benz goes more to aspects that add value and less to inefficiencies.

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